Weekly Poll (28)


Last month, a 380,000-gallon oil leak was reported near Edinburgh, North Dakota. At first, the spill was reported to affect 22,500 square feet of land, but later that number was reported to actually be 10 times that amount, totaling roughly 209,100 square feet. Do you think the industry needs a better system when estimating environmental damages during initial response times?


A 10-page update released by the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board showed that the reason behind the Philadelphia Energy Solutions explosions that occurred in June could be pointed to a degraded piece of metal piping. Given that the segment of piping had high nickel and copper content, which is susceptible to corrosion caused by the hydrofluoric acid in the process fluid, do you believe this incident could have been avoided?


Recently, Louisiana’s Sunshine Bridge was struck a second time since its last incident in October. According to reports, Dank Silver (the tanker ship involved) damaged the fender system that serves to protect the bridge. DOTD spokesperson Rodney Mallett noted that the structures themselves are designed to handle this kind of damage, however, with reoccurring instances and increased water traffic, do you think fenders are the best option for bridge protection?


A bill was filed by Sen. Joe Gruters, R-Sarasota, after a Florida county’s Bee Ridge treatment facility witnessed a pipe burst, releasing an estimated 900,000 gallons of wastewater, some of which flowed into a stormwater system and out into Sarasota Bay. The proposal suggests that if another sewage spill were to occur, $1 would be fined for every gallon lost. Do you think this legislation will encourage more improvements in wastewater infrastructure?


In April, a stress corrosion crack was to blame for a gas pipeline explosion that occurred just north of Mexico, Missouri. Reports indicate that the pipeline was previously tested in 2015, involving a magnetic field test. However, when a hydrotest was taken of the pipe following the incident, the test failed four times prior to its success. Do you believe pipeline inspections should be using hydro-technology over magnetic methods?


Earlier this month, a judge stopped the release of records related to the Florida International University bridge collapse. Do you think this was the best choice to protect the investigation?


A recent jobsite accident in a San Francisco transit tunnel has spurred promises from the San Francisco MTA to better vet general contractors. Should letting agencies investigate bidders' safety records during the contract process?


Officials from chemical company Arkema were recently indicted over explosions that occurred at a Texas plant during Hurricane Harvey last year. Should the company face charges over an incident brought on by such extreme conditions?


In January, USA Today released a list of the country’s most dangerous jobs, with painting in construction and maintenance taking 24th place (out of 25) based on data related to injuries and deaths. Do you think this is an accurate depiction of the danger of professional painting?


The retaliation portion of OSHA's Final Rule to Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses puts another layer of enforcement on Section 11(c) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, which prohibits any person from discharging or discriminating against an employee who reports a fatality, injury or illness. Do you think this is necessary?


Last month, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signed into law a controversial bill on worker safety, effectively mandating that 180,000 city construction workers need 40-55 hours of safety training before December 2018. Do you agree that this extra training is needed?


A Massachusetts painter was recently killed when his scissor lift came into contact with power lines. Have you or a member of your crew ever had a close call around power lines?


OSHA’s recent “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses” rule requires employers to submit detailed injury and illness logs to the Agency and some of this information will be made public. Is this regulation a good or bad idea?


Last month, a painter fell to his death on a water tower job, working for a firm with numerous safety violations and falls in its history. What more can be done to prevent such tragedies?


When a safety inspector finds a potentially unsafe condition on a jobsite and notifies supervisors who then fail to warn workers of the danger, he or she should:


A new system allows workers to anonymously text information and photos about site hazards and near misses to employers. Good idea or bad idea?


How much training do you/your employees receive in dealing with emergencies (fire, structural collapse, etc.) on a work site?


What do you think of OSHA’s proposal to move injury and illness reporting online and make it available to the public?


Deaths and citations from worksite falls are reaching new highs. So why do so many workers still skip fall protection?


Deaths and citations from worksite falls are reaching new highs. Why don’t more workers use appropriate fall protection?


Some parties involved in fatal structural collapses are facing criminal charges. Should such collapses be investigated as civil matters, criminal matters, or both?


Multiple studies suggest that workers underreport on-the-job injuries and illnesses. What do you see?


Recent fatal structural collapses have led to criminal charges against site owners, contractors and even local authorities. In general, should these accidents be investigated as crimes?


A Pennsylvania painting company owner faces criminal charges for the electrocution of an employee. Authorities say he ignored the presence of high-power lines on a job site. Is the charge fair?


An experienced industrial painter crippled in a 40-foot fall was recently awarded $2.3 million for his injuries, although he was not wearing fall protection. What do you think of this jury verdict?


Most workplace deaths and serious injuries are easily prevented with well-known safety precautions, yet horrific industry accidents still happen frequently. Who is most responsible for this situation?


A year after the catastrophic BP oil spill in the Gulf, which aspect of the offshore industry still needs the most attention?


Several recent catastrophic workplace accidents have prompted criminal charges against owners of companies involved in the project. When should criminal charges against company officers be an option?


 
 
   

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