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October 17 - October 23, 2011

When should you specify UHP waterjetting on bridges?


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From Lee Edelman of Independant on October 16, 2011:
UHP waterjetting is specified for some overpasses where there is a high volume of traffic. UHP waterjetting generates minimal dust and has a low volume of waste compared to abrasive blasting. Usually, a rapid deployment is required for overpasses in high traffic areas. The contractor has all equipment in a train (set up on flat bed trucks) that can be mobilized and removed rapidly. Vertical lift bridges would be another choice for UHP waterjetting. These bridges have motors, sheaves, trunnions and greased cables that abrasive blast media can enter, causing breakdowns and wear. When lead is present on bridges, all proper precautions should be taken. The contractor should be SSPC-QP 2 qualified and follow all state, federal and local regulations.

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Tagged categories: Bridges; Surface preparation; Surface Preparation; Waterjetting


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