Up to $8M Available for Energy Ideas

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2015


Are you a building science expert interested in efficiency innovation? If so, the Energy Department wants to send you money.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy recently announced a funding opportunity for those interested in supporting the agency’s efforts in reducing energy use of commercial and residential buildings.

Those interested could be in the running for an $8 million kitty the department has to offer for those with interesting innovative projects.

About the Initiative

Called “Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers & Innovations Technologies (BENEFIT) – 2016,” (also known as DE-FOA-0001383), The Building Technology’s Office (BTO) Emerging Technologies Program has broken down its interests into three main areas.

The Innovations section is for those who have early-stage development ideas. Topics for the Innovations section include Open Topic for Energy Efficiency Solutions for Residential and Commercial Buildings and Infiltration Diagnostic Technologies.

Frontiers—those who are involved in later-stage development—includes a section on Advanced Air-Sealing Technologies for Existing Buildings.

In addition to the $8 million funding opportunity, the department says a supplemental section will provide a maximum of $100,000 per year for the Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development (BUILD) supplement for to those innovators who partner with universities and nonprofit companies to develop ideas further.

How to Apply

Concept papers are due by Jan. 29, 2016, with the submission for full applications due by April 18. An informational webinar will be held between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. EST Monday (Dec. 21). Those wishing to attend the webinar can register here.

A current portfolio of building technology projects can be seen here. Those with questions should contact BENEFIT2016@ee.doe.gov.

   

Tagged categories: Air leakage; Building Envelope; Conservation; Energy efficiency; Green design; North America; Solar energy; U.S. Department of Energy

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