Roads, Bridges to Get $333.9M in Relief

TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2014


Nearly 40 repair projects in 21 U.S. states will get emergency relief funds to address a maintenance backlog, federal transportation officials say.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx announced $333,930,456 in the second allocation of emergency relief funds for fiscal year 2014.

The Federal Highway Administration's Emergency Relief program reimburses states for expenses associated with damage from natural disasters or other emergency situations.

'Making Good' on a Promise

Tens of millions of funds from this round will address a backlog of damages that occurred before 2012.

The funds will help repair roads and bridges damaged by storms, floods and other unexpected events dating at least as far back as the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989. Other events, such as the tilting piers on Delaware's I-495 bridge, happened in recent months.

"We are making good on our promise to help residents in states affected by natural disasters and other emergencies," said Foxx.

The funds come from the U.S. Treasury's General Fund, not the federal Highway Trust Fund. The money will be used to reconstruct or replace of damaged highways and bridges, establish detours and replace guardrails, or other damaged safety devices.

"These funds are part of our ongoing commitment to Americans all across the country to make sure that the damaged roads and bridges they depend on to get to work or deliver goods are restored as quickly as possible," said Foxx.

Funds by State

The largest allocation for a single event is $130 million to address September 2013 flooding in Colorado. Washington State will get the second-largest allocation, $35 million, to make repairs on S.R. 530 after a mudslide in March.

FHWA
© iStock / Sjo

"These funds are part of our ongoing commitment to Americans all across the country to make sure that the damaged roads and bridges they depend on to get to work or deliver goods are restored as quickly as possible," said Foxx.

The states and their allocations are:

  • Alabama, $3.9 million (four events);
  • Alaska, $6.7 million (two events);
  • Arizona, $1.9 million (one event);
  • California, $71.2 million (nine events);
  • Colorado, $132 million (two events);
  • Delaware, $33 million (one event);
  • Kentucky, $3,106,000 (one event);
  • Indiana, $2 million (one event);
  • Louisiana, $2,306,456 (one event);
  • Minnesota, $5 million (one event);
  • Missouri, $800,000 (one event);
  • New Hampshire, $2.65 million (one event);
  • New York, $5 million (one event);
  • North Carolina, $7.94 million (four events);
  • Ohio, $9.2 million (one event);
  • Oklahoma, $256,000 (one event);
  • Pennsylvania, $2.5 million (one event);
  • South Carolina, $1,704,000 (two events);
  • Virginia, $500,000 (one event);
  • Washington, $38.5 million (two events); and
  • Wyoming, $3,768,000 (one event).

"These funds will help states restore their transportation networks," said Gregory Nadeau, Acting Federal Highway Administrator.

"Getting life back to normal in these areas is our top priority, and safe, functional, transportation is at the heart of that."

   

Tagged categories: Bridges; Disasters; Federal Highway Administration (FHWA); Funding; Government; Program/Project Management; Roads/Highways

Join the Conversation:

Sign in to our community to add your comments.