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Company Combats 'Bottleneck' Demand for Black Pigment

Wednesday, December 16, 2020

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Lanxess, a German specialty chemicals company, recently announced that it is increasing its black pigment capacity. The company says that it’s responding to a bottleneck cause by a demand for its synthetic iron oxide pigments that are used to color concrete.

The company says it is expanding its Krefeld-Uerdingen site by more than 5,000 metric tons a year.

“The increased demand from the construction industry, in particular for our unique black pigments to color concrete, can be even better met with the debottlenecking measures that have now been completed,” says Holger Hüppeler, head of the Inorganic Pigments business unit at Lanxess.

Lanxess

Lanxess, a German specialty chemicals company, recently announced that it is increasing its black pigment capacity. The company says that it’s responding to a bottleneck cause by a demand for its synthetic iron oxide pigments that are used to color concrete.

The company notes that its pigments are independently certified and tested for safe use in ultra-high-strength concretes. They are also certified for the high content of their recycled raw materials by the SC Global Service, a global certification and audit company.

Other Demand/Research

The interest in black pigments spans the different corners of the industry—particularly when sustainability is involved.

In July, The Shepherd Color Company announced that it had released a new infrared reflecting black pigment that it says will aid in the recycling of black plastic.

The company says that its research and development team wanted to create something for both the coatings and plastics industries to not just bring value to customers, but to add sustainability to the environment.

Shepherd maintains that a solution was needed because, in general, recycled items that are coated in black pigment are coated in a carbon black, which actually absorbs the light from emitters used in recycling/sorting centers.

This absorption can prevent the sensor from identifying the polymer used in the product, making the machine reject the material instead of recycling it.

The new IR black, Arctic Black 10P925, reflects the wavelengths in the facilities so that the product can be recycled.

According to the company, the pigment is non-magnetic and a single pigment solution that is listed on chemical registries for global supply.

Earlier, in March of this year, research came out of multiple places taking a closer look at dark pigments.

Researchers at Duke University turned to butterflies for a design on thin, lightweight ultra-black coatings.

For the study, which was published in Nature Communications, Duke researchers used high resolution scanning electron microscopy and computer simulations to examine the microscopic structures on the wings of 10 species of ultra-black butterflies and four regular black or dark brown butterflies from Central and South America and Asia.

The butterflies used in the study are reportedly 10-100 times darker than charcoal, fresh asphalt, black velvet and other everyday black objects, according to the researchers.

As little as 0.06% of the light that hits them is reflected back to the eye.

And, at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Karlsruhe, Germany), researchers were involved in a project that’s building a test facility for the active reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

This facility would convert CO2 into pure carbon black powder as part of a Negative Carbon Dioxide to Carbon (NECOC) research project. The point of the project is not only to create carbon black powder, but it’s also to remove some CO2 from the air in the process.

   

Tagged categories: Asia Pacific; Color; Color + Design; Color + Design; EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa); Latin America; North America; Pigments; Z-Continents

Comment from Tom Schwerdt, (12/16/2020, 8:43 AM)

Something around 10% of plastics actually get recycled - it's more of a "feel good" promoted by the plastics producers rather than a real solution to our rather massive plastic waste problem.


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