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Research Taps Janus Particles for Smart Coatings

Friday, August 28, 2020

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Iowa State University, along with Binghamton University, have coauthored a study showing that nanoparticles known as Janus particles could be the key to more environmentally friendly paints and coatings.

Xin Yong—an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Binghamton University’s Thomas J. Watson College of Engineering and Applied Science—teamed up with Iowa State’s Shan Jiang (an assistant professor in the university’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering) and Chunhui Xiang (an assistant professor in its Department of Apparel, Events and Hospitality Management) for a study published in the August edition of the journal Materials Horizons.

Binghamton University

Iowa State University, along with Binghamton University, have coauthored a study showing that nanoparticles known as Janus particles could be the key to more environmentally friendly paints and coatings.

“Previous studies are heavily focused on structures formed by these particles at a very small scale, because they have unique surface properties,” Yong said. “In this study, we are trying to use these particles to improve the performance of paints and coating, which no one has ever thought about.”

Janus particles have two surfaces with distinct, different physical properties—one combination of which is for one side to be hydrophilic and the other hydrophobic.

For the paper “Self-stratification of amphiphilic particles at coating surfaces,” the research team mixed hydrophilic/hydrophobic Janus particles with commercial paints, then painted surfaces to see how the particles would react.

According to researchers, the hydrophilic side oriented to the surface and helped the coatings adhere better, while the hydrophobic side faced toward the surface and made it water-repellant. The researchers also found that the particles diffused and arranged themselves into self-stratifying layers more quickly and in ways that did not completely follow their hypotheses.

“Currently no theory can be used to explain the self-stratification behaviors of Janus particles,” Jiang said. “However, more studies are warranted to probe the detailed mechanism [of the particles]. I hope by fully understanding the principles in Janus particle self-stratification, we will be able to design next-generation ‘smart’ coating materials that are more environmentally friendly with better properties.”

   

Tagged categories: Asia Pacific; Coatings Technology; Coatings Technology; EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa); hydrophobic coatings; Latin America; Nanotechnology; North America; Research and development; Z-Continents

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