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DC Awards Contract for Temp Patient Space

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

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Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser announced last week that the administration has issued a design-build contract to Hensel Phelps Construction Co. to convert the Walter E. Washington Convention Center’s three halls into an in-patient healthcare facility in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The administration notes that, while the goal is to never use the facility, it is working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to have the halls done by the first week of May.

“While our goal is to never use the Convention Center, we must have the capacity to support a potential increase in COVID-19 patients,” said Bowser. “We thank the Army Corps, FEMA and Events D.C. for their continued partnership during this public health emergency.”

According to Bisnow, the hall's total 473,000 square feet and can fit 1,500 beds. The facility is slated to open in phases, however, with 500 beds to be made available by the May target date and another 1,000 by the end of next month.

APK, CC-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser announced last week that the administration has issued a design-build contract to Hensel Phelps Construction Co. to convert the Walter E. Washington Convention Center’s three halls into an in-patient healthcare facility in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Through FEMA, our job is to provide the District of Columbia with a tailored space that meets their anticipated medical surge needs to augment existing healthcare facilities,” said Col. John Litz, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District Commander.

“Our goal, leveraging our contractor’s expertise, is to get this site operational as quickly as possible while meeting medical standards, so equipment and beds can be placed and health care providers can take over, should the need arise.”

Other Facilities

Several other cities have also announced plans for temporary facilities to combat the health crisis.

Earlier this month, the city of Colorado reached an agreement with M.A. Mortenson Co. as part of an alleged bid-rigging settlement that the company will donate its construction services for a COVID-19-related project valued at $650,000 or more.

While no design details have been released on the project, Mortenson will pay all of its own costs of service and construction costs, including building materials and costs of any subcontractor and design services contracted to complete the pandemic-related project.

The company will also cover all change orders that increase the project cost up to 15%.

In Philadelphia, officials have said that the University of Pennsylvania Health System’s new Pavilion is slated to partially open this month—15 months ahead of schedule.

Despite government shutdowns of most construction projects in the state, Gov. Tom Wolf, along with the Philadelphia Building and Construction Trades Council, approved continued construction at the $1.5 billion, 17-story, 1.5 million-square-foot project in order to increase capacity for the health crisis.

Penn Medicine

In Philadelphia, officials have said that the University of Pennsylvania Health System’s new Pavilion is slated to partially open this month—15 months ahead of schedule.

Crews are now working to complete about 120 of the planned 500 total patient rooms as soon as possible, according to a project spokesperson. One half of the 120 beds will be in the emergency department and the other half will be long-term patient care.

While the rushed rooms will be in a generally unfinished building, the spaces will be outfitted with “state-of-the-art technology and equipment that allow for top-notch patient care,” according to the school.

Last month, multiple state governors announced that they were in talks with the Army Corps of Engineers for plans on site for temporary hospitals to combat capacity issues resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Both New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker were among those who confirmed talks with the Corps.

Cuomo announced that he has accepted the recommendation from the Corps for four temporary hospital sites in New York— the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, SUNY Stony Brook, SUNY Old Westbury and the Westchester Convention Center.

Cuomo visited each of the sites and gave the green light for construction to start immediately. Hospitals at the SUNY campus sites will reportedly be constructed indoors with outdoor tent support and the dormitories on the campuses will be used for healthcare staff to stay while working at the sites.

Baker confirmed his Corps talks via press conference and said that they are also looking at college dorm sites as prime spots to erect temporary facilities.

View all of PaintSquare Daily News' coverage on COVID-19, here.

   

Tagged categories: Contract awards; Convention Centers; COVID-19; Health & Safety; Health and safety; Health Care/Hospitals; NA; North America; Safety; Upcoming projects

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