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Report: 46,154 Bridges Need Repairs

Friday, April 17, 2020

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According to an analysis report issued by the American Road and Transportation Builders Association regarding the U.S. Department of Transportation 2019 National Bridge Inventory, more than 46,000 bridges in the United States have been classified as structurally deficient and in poor condition.

However, this number has declined by almost 1,000—0.1% lower—since ARTBA reported on the inventory last year. The association notes that at this rate, it would take over 50 years to repair all the structures.

"There's not a lot of new money. It really is just keeping pace with project costs and inflation," said Alison Black, Chief Economist for ARTBA. "I think if we saw a significant increase in the federal funding side of this that would really go a long way to help states that are trying to provide some of these repairs and fix these bridges."

Looking at even larger numbers, the ARTBA adds that nearly 231,000 bridge spans need repair work (roughly 37% of all U.S. bridges) and to have all of them be fixed, it would cost nearly  $164 billion, based on averages calculated by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA).

© iStock.com / dlerick

According to an analysis report issued by the American Road and Transportation Builders Association regarding the U.S. Department of Transportation 2019 National Bridge Inventory, over 46,000 bridges in the United States have been classified as structurally deficient and in poor condition.

In addition to national-scale statistics, the ARTBA report breaks down structurally deficient and functionally obsolete bridges by state, and lists the most-traveled deficient bridges in the country. And for the first time this year, the ARTBA has also reported on the percentage of bridge deck area that is classified as structurally deficient.

Busiest Deficient Spans, Decks

For another year, the U.S. 101 bridge, along with Interstates 405 and 5 in California, are again reported to be the busiest structurally deficient spans in the nation, seeing as many as 289,000 crossings per day.

In reporting on states with the largest number of deficient bridges, keeping record from last year, both Iowa and Pennsylvania took the top spots—with 4,575 and 3,501, respectively. In Iowa, that accounts for 19% of all bridges, and in Pennsylvania, 15.3%. However, both numbers are slightly down from last year: In 2019, Iowa reported 19.4% of bridges were structurally deficient, and Pennsylvania reported 16.6%.

The other eight of the top 10 states in terms of structurally deficient bridges include:

  • Illinois (2,407);
  • Oklahoma (2,352);
  • Missouri (2,147);
  • California (1,797);
  • New York (1,745);
  • North Carolina (1,714);
  • Louisiana (1,701); and
  • West Virginia (1,531).

Again matching last year’s report, Rhode Island has the highest rate of deficient bridges with 22.3% of its bridges falling under the deficient criteria, and also took the lead for most structurally deficient bridge deck areas with 23%.

   

Tagged categories: Annual report; Bridges; Bridges; Infrastructure; NA; North America; Project Management; Quality Control; Rehabilitation/Repair

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