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Researchers Develop Crack-Resistant Concrete

Tuesday, December 3, 2019

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Engineers based out of the Military Studies Center at Russia's Far Eastern Federal University recently developed concrete that is more resistant to cracking than its more traditional counterparts.

The secret? Though customarily concrete uses pure cement as a binder, in this recent development, roughly 40% of the cement was replaced with a binder composed of rice husk cinder, limestone crushing waste and silica sand.

Crack-Resistant Concrete

The concrete is reportedly six to nine times more crack-resistant than more traditional versions of the building material. Additionally, the concrete is most suitable for use in the construction of military and civil defense structures, as well as load-carrying structures found in nuclear power plants. The concrete can also be used for the construction of buildings in the Arctic.

Far Eastern Federal University

Engineers based out of the Military Studies Center at Russia's Far Eastern Federal University recently developed concrete that is more resistant to cracking than its more traditional counterparts.

The strength of the concrete is demonstrated most in relation to the impact on the building material: What has been billed the “rubber effect” comes into play, causing the concrete to contract and become springy, without cracking. The concrete can absorb the impact thanks to its dynamic viscosity.

According to Popular Mechanics, researchers have been investigating rice husk cinder as an alternative or something to be added to fly ash for some time.

"We've balanced the components with the accuracy of 0.5%. It was important for us that the concrete holds up until the first crack for as long as possible, because after a concrete structure cracks its deterioration is just a matter of time,” said Roman Fediuk, a professor at the Military Studies Center at Far Eastern Federal University.

"Today the whole world is working on counter-terrorist security facilities that would defend other structures from a shell hit or a plane crash. We've approached this issue from our own angle and developed an impact-proof material. On the next stage of our work we want to create radiation-resistant concrete."

There are also reportedly current plans in place for manufacturing and implementation. The concrete may also prove to be more cost-effective to create, as it contains less cement.

The research was published in Inorganic Materials: Applied Research.

   

Tagged categories: Asia Pacific; Building materials; concrete; EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa); Latin America; North America; Program/Project Management; Research and development; Z-Continents

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