Coatings Industry News

Main News Page


Study: Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete

Monday, November 18, 2019

Comment | More

Researchers from the International Union of Laboratories and Experts in Construction Materials, Systems and Structures have recently conducted a study focusing on the corrosion of steel bars used to internally strengthen structures made of reinforced concrete.

The Research

According to the studies, the two factors that most influence this type of corrosion are recognized as carbonation—the chemical reaction that occurs when a concrete covering comes into contact with carbon dioxide—and the presence of chlorides, chlorine compounds—which attack steel and create a loss of material.

University of Córdoba

Researchers from the International Union of Laboratories and Experts in Construction Materials, Systems and Structures have recently conducted a study focusing on the corrosion of steel bars used to internally strengthen structures made of reinforced concrete.

"We shared research projects performed beforehand in order to find out what is really happening in the reinforced concrete contact area when corrosion due to chlorides takes place, as well as what factors mainly influence the process," said Mercedes Sánchez, a University of Córdoba researcher who participated in the study.

However, the main aim of the study was to find a solution to these two factors, or at least the delay the process. From the work conducted, researchers were able to create what Phys.org calls, “a catalog of parameters” that both highlight and define various degrees of influence that effect steel corrosion within reinforced concrete.

Currently, Sánchez’s research team is testing out different substances added into concrete mixtures so that chlorides can be trapped, thus preventing access to the steel bars and slowing down the corrosion process. Her team is also reported to be incorporating the Internet of Things to monitor reinforced steel structures in real time.

"Now, different kinds of concrete are being made: concrete with bacteria that are able to repair cracks, sustainable concrete made from recycled materials and made for vertical gardens," said Sánchez.

Other Recent Studies

In July, researchers based out of Deakin University (Geelong, Australia) designed and developed a pedestrian bridge that reportedly used a type of reinforced concrete that doesn’t require maintenance. The key was carbon and glass fiber reinforcement.

The bridge was designed by researchers Mahbube Subhani and Kazem Ghabraie, both lecturers in Civil Engineering at Deakin University. The aforementioned reinforced polymer is reportedly five times lighter than reinforced steel, and is stronger than steel. As for production requirements, the newer material only requires 25% of the energy needed to make conventional steel.

Last month, researchers based out of Ehime University, in Japan, found that the corrosion of steel bars found in reinforced concrete could be slowed. According to Science Daily, the corrosion can largely be attributed to electro-chemical reactions occurring in anodic and cathodic areas.

In order to reduce the amount of oxygen contributing to corrosion, the research team added Bacillus subtilis natto in with the cement. The aerobic bacteria is inherently resistant to unfavorable environmental conditions, including salinity. This is largely due to the development of an endospore when customary nutrition is not available. The endospore remains until conditions change to something more favorable for survival.

As noted in the paper abstract, the mortar specimens “cast with a w/c ratio of 0.50 were cracked by 4-point bending test and then they were exposed to dry (4 days) and wet (3 days) cycles.” The research team used “tap water containing 10% NaCl in order to accelerate corrosion especially at cracked parts,” according to the abstract.

   

Tagged categories: Asia Pacific; Coating Materials - Commercial; concrete; Corrosion; Corrosion protection; EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa); Good Technical Practice; Latin America; North America; Rebar; Research; Research and development; Steel; Z-Continents

Comment Join the Conversation:

Sign in to our community to add your comments.


Advertisements
 
DeFelsko Corporation

 
KTA-Tator, Inc. - Corporate Office

 
Sauereisen, Inc.

 
Fischer Technology Inc.

 
Modern Safety Techniques

 
Tarps manufacturing, Inc.

 
SAFE Systems, Inc.

 
AWWA (American Water Works Association)

 
 
 

Technology Publishing Co., 1501 Reedsdale Street, Suite 2008, Pittsburgh, PA 15233

TEL 1-412-431-8300  • FAX  1-412-431-5428  •  EMAIL webmaster@paintsquare.com


The Technology Publishing Network

PaintSquare the Journal of Protective Coatings & Linings Paint BidTracker

 
EXPLORE:      JPCL   |   PaintSquare News   |   Interact   |   Buying Guides   |   Webinars   |   Resources   |   Classifieds
REGISTER AND SUBSCRIBE:      Free PaintSquare Registration   |   Subscribe to JPCL   |   Subscribe to PaintSquare News
MORE:      About PaintSquare.com   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms & Conditions   |   Support   |   Site Map   |   Search   |   Contact Us