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Reinforced Concrete Addresses Corrosion Issues

Thursday, July 18, 2019

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Researchers based out of Deakin University (Geelong, Australia) recently designed and developed a pedestrian bridge that reportedly uses a type of reinforced concrete that does not require maintenance. The key is carbon and glass fiber reinforcement.

According to the university, the bridge was designed by researchers Mahbube Subhani and Kazem Ghabraie, both lecturers in Civil Engineering at Deakin University. Engineering firm Austeng won a contract to build two pedestrian bridges for the city.

Maintenance-Free Concrete

Subhani emphasized that this design will help avoid the issues with corrosion present in conventional steel-reinforced concrete construction.

Deakin University

Researchers based out of Deakin University (Geelong, Australia) recently designed and developed a pedestrian bridge that reportedly uses a type of reinforced concrete that does not require maintenance. The key is carbon and glass fiber reinforcement.

"We have replaced the steel reinforcing bar normally used in steel reinforced concrete with more durable carbon and glass fibre reinforced polymer," said Subhani. "Structures made with steel reinforced concrete require maintenance about every five years and major maintenance or rehabilitation every 20 years."

The aforementioned reinforced polymer is reportedly five times lighter than reinforced steel, and is stronger than steel. As for production requirements, the newer material only requires 25% of the energy needed to make conventional steel.

"The geopolymer concrete used in the bridge construction is also environmentally sustainable," said Subhani. "Instead of cement, the concrete has been made using fly ash, a by-product of coal combustion.”

Pre-testing indicates that so far, the bridge can carry the load it was intended to.

   

Tagged categories: Colleges and Universities; concrete; NA; North America; Quality Control; Research; Research and development

Comment from William Gusnard, (7/19/2019, 8:28 AM)

What happens when the "climate change" folks close down all coal fired fossil fuel plants? Then there will be no more fly-ash. In the Us. we are having to close down all of our fly ash ponds to meet government regulations and we sell it to concrete manufacturers and it is used to produce 'Black Beauty' style abrasives. Also, fly ash contains silica and it does not meet the proposed silica guidelines in the US.


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