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Wright House Reassembled in PA Park

Friday, June 7, 2019

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Workers have recently concluded the reconstruction of Frank Lloyd Wright’s RW Lindholm House in Acme, Pennsylvania—about 1,000 miles from where it was originally built.

The 1950s Usonian-style home was moved from its original Cloquet, Minnesota, home in 2016.

What Happened

The 2,300-square-foot house—better known as Mäntylä, which is Finnish for “among the pines”—was originally designed by Wright for businessman Ray Lindholm and his wife Emmy. The home stayed in the family all the way until a few years ago, when Lindholm’s grandson, Peter McKinney, and his wife Julene began working with the Chicago-based Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy.

The building, constructed of concrete block with a roof clad in red Ludowici tiles, was originally set in a secluded wooded area, which had changed over time with commercial properties popping up around the site.

"The Conservancy worked with the McKinneys to market the house to potential buyers who would keep the house on its original site, which had become encroached by burgeoning retail development along a brightly lit and noisy commercial strip," the Conservancy said in a statement.

After no suitable buyers were found for the house, the owners decided to donate it to the Usonian Preservation, an organization that’s affiliated with Polymath Park in Acme, Pennsylvania, which already housed multiple Wright-designed properties.

The decision was made to up and move the house.

"The Conservancy has long disfavored moving a Wright house unless its demolition is imminent or its site becomes so compromised that it is unmarketable," said Barbara Gordon, executive director of the Conservancy.

 "The McKinneys and the Conservancy concluded that there was no viable long-term future for the house as a residence on its once secluded, wooded site."

The home was deconstructed in April and May of 2016.

What Now

Crews spent the two years and about reportedly about 9,000 man hours on the home’s reconstruction.

Mäntylä joins other properties including Wright’s Duncan House and two other homes designed by Wright’s apprentice Peter Berndtson. The property is also about 20 miles away from Fallingwater.

The Wright-designed furniture for the home was also donated and archival material and copies of original drawings are also reportedly stored at the house.

The home is now open for tours. Polymath Park is open to the public March through November.

   

Tagged categories: Architecture; Color + Design; Conservation; Design; Frank Lloyd Wright; Historic Structures; NA; North America

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