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CFTs Provide Corrosive-Free Aircraft

Thursday, March 7, 2019

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Those stationed at the U.S. Kadena Air Base (Okinawa, Japan) recently enlisted the help of contracted field teams to service its aircraft fleet, primarily targeting corrosion brought on by the sub-tropical climate.

U.S. Air Force

Those stationed at the U.S. Kadena Air Base (Okinawa, Japan) recently enlisted the help of contracted field teams to service its aitcraft fleet, primarily targeting corrosion brought on by the sub-tropical climate.

Inconsistent weather patterns create a highly corrosive environment. From heavy rainfall, high humidity, high winds and typhoons, the fight against corrosion is constant for stationed aircrafts.

Aircraft Restoration

The CFTs are a group of skilled contractor maintenance personnel who specialize in maintaining airframes and equipment through corrosion control, coating touch-ups, refurbishments and lubrication.

In a study by Bio Water Synergistics—a company that specializes in aerospace wash equipment for the military—determined that up to 80 percent of Air Force aircraft maintenance costs during its service time can be contributed to corrosion.

"On average, the Department of Defense spends over $9 billion dollars on corrosion control," Michael Ward, CFT quality assurance manager. "It’s worse on Okinawa, so every aircraft asset owned by Kadena has to be washed at least every 30 days.”

This 30-day rule is required over the traditional 90-day because it factors in all of the harsh enviromental aspects such as moisture from high humidity and sea salt aerosol carried by wind from the srrounding ocean. 

Since Kedena has such a large airframe inventory, CFT operations have been split into two categories between 60 personnel: North side and South side. On the South side, fighters, helicopters, training aircrafts and smaller airframes can be serviced, while heavier airframes are washed in the North side.

Some of the heaviest airframes can take up to eight hours with a 10-to-12-man crew to completely wash and lubricate. In addition to this process, airframes must be scored for deficiencies and sprayed with corrosion prevention compounds.

Once an airframe has received a passing score, it is able to resume normal operations at the 18th Wing, 353rd Special Operations Group, Navy Commander Task Force 72.2 or one of its associated units.

   

Tagged categories: AS; Asia Pacific; Corrosion; Corrosion engineering; Corrosion protection; Corrosion resistance; Environmental Controls; Government; Government contracts; NA; North America; Program/Project Management; Quality Control; U.S. Air Force

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