Coatings Industry News

Main News Page


Old Tappan Zee Sections Find New Aquatic Life

Friday, May 4, 2018

Comment | More

Parts of the original Tappan Zee Bridge will soon be swimming with the fishes, supplementing half a dozen reefs off Long Island. The first barge of material is set to leave this week, with another 29 following throughout the summer and early fall.

The old Tappan Zee, which spanned the Hudson River from 1955 to 2017, is slowly being picked apart, with some other pieces also destined for scrapyards and infrastructure projects.

Becoming the Reef

According to The New York Times, the function behind the endeavor is twofold: Disposing of the old bridge parts this way is both affordable and practical, while also providing new habitats for marine life. Currently, New York state maintains 12 artificial reefs: two in Long Island Sound, two in the Great South Bay and eight in the Atlantic Ocean. Six of these will receive pieces of the old bridge. The span’s steel trusses may also be used to build up the reefs.

SteveStrummer, CC-BY-SA-4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Parts of the original Tappan Zee bridge (pictured in the background, with the replacement in the foreground) will soon be swimming with the fishes, supplementing half a dozen reefs off Long Island. The first barge of material is set to leave this week, with another 29 following throughout the summer and early fall.

According to state officials, all materials will be cleaned thoroughly before being submerged. The cost of transporting the materials amounts to $5 million, and is being covered by the New York State Power Authority and Tappan Zee Constructors, the team of private contractors building the Tappan Zee replacement bridge.

Other materials, including 30 decommissioned barges, tugboats and tenders, as well as scrap metal, will be joining the bridge beneath the waves.

“These iconic symbols of New York—subway cars and now the Tappan Zee—can keep on living,” said Bill Ulfelder, executive director of the Nature Conservancy in New York. “Now they’re home for fishes, crustaceans and shellfish—other New Yorkers.”

The old Tappan Zee carried nearly 140,000 vehicles a day at its peak. Eventually, the span began to show its age, warranting extensive repairs. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo proposed a $4 billion replacement last year—a pair of modern spans the retain the name of its forebear. Officially named the Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge, the new span is three miles long, remaining the longest bridge in the state.

   

Tagged categories: Bridges; Historic Structures; Infrastructure; NA; North America; Program/Project Management

Comment Join the Conversation:

Sign in to our community to add your comments.


Advertisements
 
KTA-Tator, Inc. - Corporate Office

 
Fischer Technology Inc.

 
SAFE Systems, Inc.

 
DeFelsko Corporation

 
WEFTEC Show

 
ABKaelin, LLC

 
Mitsubishi Gas Chemical America

 
Tarps manufacturing, Inc.

 
RCG America

 
Modern Safety Techniques

 
 
 

Technology Publishing Co., 1501 Reedsdale Street, Suite 2008, Pittsburgh, PA 15233

TEL 1-412-431-8300  • FAX  1-412-431-5428  •  EMAIL webmaster@paintsquare.com


The Technology Publishing Network

PaintSquare the Journal of Protective Coatings & Linings Paint BidTracker

 
EXPLORE:      JPCL   |   PaintSquare News   |   Interact   |   Buying Guides   |   Webinars   |   Resources   |   Classifieds
REGISTER AND SUBSCRIBE:      Free PaintSquare Registration   |   Subscribe to JPCL   |   Subscribe to PaintSquare News
MORE:      About PaintSquare.com   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms & Conditions   |   Support   |   Site Map   |   Search   |   Contact Us