Coatings Industry News

Main News Page


Floating Bridge Design Sets Sail

Friday, August 18, 2017

Comment | More

A futuristic floating pedestrian bridge may sail the local waters of the Mongolian city of Ordos, according to plans recently revealed by architect Margot Krasojevic.

The Revolving Rail Bridge was commissioned by the government of Ordos—which is in the Kanbashi District in Mongolia—to span the Wulanmulun River, noted designboom. Krasojevic’s proposal details the futuristic bridge as a flexible structure—it can “sail” along the river to wherever it is needed.

Krasojevic herself is most known for her work incorporating form, geometry, sustainability and smart materials. Previously, she has worked with Zaha Hadid Architects and NOX.

Revolving Rail Bridge Structure

What makes the proposed bridge both dynamic and flexible are its main floating section, a carbon-fiber triple sail and three expanding walkways that the structure supports. The walkways would adapt, in a sense, to different quays, spanning the river and adjusting accordingly.

Images: Margot Krasojevic, via v2com

What makes the bridge both dynamic and flexible are its main floating section, a carbon-fiber triple sail and three expanding walkways that the structure supports.

With the sail and the rotator supporting the main body of the bridge, the landing docks of the Wulanmulun would brace and support the expanding walkway when it is down. Solar panels would feed energy to the three-electric motor generator that powers the walkway.

The bridge itself would be able to fold its many sections into a stack, which allows for the entire structure to move along the rail when needed. Cylindrical crossflow turbines provide both buoyancy and stability as they skim just along the surface of the water. With the support of the turbines, the primary body of the bridge would act something like a raft, according to designboom.

Bridge Mechanisms

Movement of the bridge would be guided by the sail, which is framed in aluminum and covered in carbon-fiber polymer. To move the sails, noted ArchDaily, hydraulically operated tanks would take on or dispose of water. This rotates the sail in either a horizontal or vertical direction while helping keep the structure afloat.

A primary ring frame with eight marine flotation air bags helps to stabilize the sail, along with preventing capsizing through assisting in distributing the weight evenly, according to the proposal.

When the bridge is in use, the sail would do double-duty—it would lower and provide a canopy over an area with seats, allowing visitors to enjoy the gardens on the platform and local views.

The walkways would adapt, in a sense, to different quays, spanning the river and adjusting accordingly.

In comparison, when the structure is docked, screw-in moorings and nine-ton anchors would keep the structure stable, and also help prevent the futuristic feature from floating away.

When necessary, the bridge could be moved by motoring, towing or sailing. This means that the proposed bridge is truly capable of sailing the local seas—the Wulanmulun River. 

   

Tagged categories: Architects; AS; Asia Pacific; Bridges; Color + Design; Infrastructure; Program/Project Management

Comment Join the Conversation:

Sign in to our community to add your comments.


Advertisements
 
KTA-Tator, Inc. - Corporate Office

 
DeFelsko Corporation

 
Strategic Materials Inc.

 
SAFE Systems, Inc.

 
Sauereisen, Inc.

 
Tarps manufacturing, Inc.

 
 
 

Technology Publishing Co., 1501 Reedsdale Street, Suite 2008, Pittsburgh, PA 15233

TEL 1-412-431-8300  • FAX  1-412-431-5428  •  EMAIL webmaster@paintsquare.com


The Technology Publishing Network

PaintSquare the Journal of Protective Coatings & Linings Paint BidTracker

 
EXPLORE:      JPCL   |   PaintSquare News   |   Interact   |   Buying Guides   |   Webinars   |   Resources   |   Classifieds
REGISTER AND SUBSCRIBE:      Free PaintSquare Registration   |   Subscribe to JPCL   |   Subscribe to PaintSquare News
MORE:      About PaintSquare.com   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms & Conditions   |   Support   |   Site Map   |   Search   |   Contact Us