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MoDot May Have the Bridge for You

Friday, February 19, 2016

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Anyone need a bridge?

The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) currently has seven bridges that are free to a good home.

According to the Free Bridges page on the MoDOT website, states undertaking projects using federal funds that involve demolition of a historic bridge are to make the bridge available to others who agree to maintain the bridge and its historically significant features, and also accept legal and financial responsibility for the structure.

MoDOT
Photos: MoDOT

Seven bridges on the MoDOT site are available for reuse in place or relocation to a suitable location, including the five-span, camelback through truss Forsyth Bridge.

The seven bridges on the MoDOT site are available for reuse in place or relocation to a suitable location, it says.

“These bridges are considered historic as they are eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places,” Karen Daniels, MoDOT’s senior historic preservation specialist, told Equipment World.

“We encourage any individual or organization who may be interested in taking all or part of these bridges to submit a proposal for reuse.”

Reuse of Historic Bridges

Title 23 U.S. Code 144(g), “National bridge and tunnel inventory and inspection standards,” defines a historic bridge as any “that is listed on, or eligible for listing on, the National Register of Historic Places.”

In keeping with the requirement to “first make the historic bridge available for donation to a State, locality, or responsible private entity,” MoDOT and its local transportation partners are advertising a selection of bridges that meet the qualification of being eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

Because they are historic, preservation covenants to help preserve them and the features that make them historic, may apply, the agency says.

MoDOT

To assist in the relocation of a bridge, such as the five-span Champ Clark Bridge, up to 80 percent of the costs that would have been spent to demolish the bridge may be available to reimburse the new owners for their reuse.

To assist in the relocation activities, up to 80 percent of the costs that would have been spent to demolish the bridges may be available to reimburse the new owners for their reuse.

The funds are meant to be used in situations in which the new owner is actively removing the bridge from its current location. Funds are not available in instances in which the new owner has the bridge removed and set aside for later pick-up, as this is deemed a removal of the bridge under "demolition" activity.

When bridge ownership is transferred, the new owner will assume all legal and financial responsibility for the structure.

Take Your Pick

If you are interested in submitting a proposal to request one of its historic bridges or the individual spans of multi-span bridges, MoDOT asks that you make use of its Proposal Checklist before applying. Contact information for each bridge proposal is included on its information page.

Bridges available for reuse or relocation include the following.

Forsyth Bridge, a five-span, camelback through truss composed of four 181-foot and one 182-foot through truss spans with two steel stringer approach spans. The bridge, built in 1953, has a 23-foot 11-inch roadway and a 14-foot 1-inch vertical clearance over the concrete deck. MoDOT's Historic Preservation Section is accepting proposals for the reuse of the bridge in the current location or for the relocation of the bridge or its components until June 1, 2016.

The Champ Clark Bridge, built between 1926 and 1932 and also known as the Louisiana Bridge, is a five-span Pennsylvania through truss with main spans of various lengths, ranging between 312 and 418 feet. It contains one 25-foot steel girder approach span on the west end and six steel girder approach spans on the east end. The bridge has a vertical clearance of 14-feet 9-inches above the deck, and the asphalt-covered concrete deck is 20-feet wide curb-to curb. MoDOT is accepting proposals for the relocation and reuse of the bridge, any of its main spans individually, or its components for reuse in another location.

The North Fabius River Bridge is a 1930, seven-panel, skewed, riveted Pratt through truss with one 20-foot deck girder approach span on the south end and four 40-foot deck girder approach spans on the north end. The main span is a 111-feet 6-inch through truss with a half-panel (22-degree) skew, laced portal bracing and verticals and built up members. MoDOT’s Historic Preservation Section is accepting proposals for the relocation and reuse of the bridge or its components until May 31, 2016.

MoDOT

The North Fabius River Bridge is a seven-panel, skewed, riveted Pratt through truss bridge originally built in 1930.

The Withington Ford Bridge, built between 1916 and 1917, is a Pratt Truss subtype: Pennsylvania through truss bridge consisting of two 200-foot spans with an overall length of 422 feet. It is a single lane-bridge with a roadway width of 15 feet. The superstructure is a steel, 10-panel, pin-connected Pennsylvania through truss with steel stringer approaches. The decking is asphalt on timber over steel stringers. The substructure consists of concrete abutments and piers.

MoDOT

Built between 1916 and 1917, the Withington Ford Bridge has a steel superstructure, steel stringer approaches, and asphalt decking on timber over steel stringers.

The Noix Creek Bridge is a 1935-1936 Warren with all-verticals pony truss with a polygonal top chord. The pony truss span is 101 feet long, with one 35-foot approach span on the west end and two 35-foot approach spans on the east end. The bridge has sidewalks cantilevered over both sides with concrete rails. It has a roadway deck width of 23 feet, 10 inches; with the sidewalks, it measures 42 feet, 7 inches. Proposals for the relocation and reuse of the bridge or its components are being accepted until May 31, 2016.

MoDOT

The Noix Creek Bridge is a 1935-1936 Warren with all-verticals pony truss with a polygonal top chord; it has sidewalks cantilevered over both sides with concrete rails.

The Buffalo Creek Bridge is a 1935-1936 Warren web pony truss with alternating verticals. The pony truss span is 92 feet, 6inches long, with two 45-foot approach spans on the east end. It has a deck width of 22 feet for the roadway. Proposals for this structure are being accepted through May 31.

MoDOT

Built between 1935 and 1936, the Buffalo Creek Bridge is a Warren web pony truss with alternating verticals.

The McCarty Creek Bridge is a 60-foot 4-panel, pin-connected Pratt pony truss with cut stone masonry abutments and timber deck over steel stringers. Built around 1895, the bridge is in original and relatively good condition, according to MoDOT, which adds that its small size and original condition would make it an excellent candidate for reuse in another location. Proposals for the relocation and reuse of the bridge or its components until April 29, 2016.

MoDOT

MoDOT says the small size and good original condition of the 60-foot 4-panel McCarty Creek Bridge make it an excellent candidate for reuse in another location.

 

   

Tagged categories: Bridges; Infrastructure; North America; Program/Project Management; Rehabilitation/Repair; Renovation; Steel; Transportation

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