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February 20 - February 26, 2012

Some painting specifications call for the use of “Best Effort” in relation to blasting. How does one determine “Best Effort?”

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Selected Answers

From James Albertoni of CA Department of Water Resources on December 18, 2013:
As an owner, I frequently have to write "best effort" into my rehab specifications simply because an area is not accessible for blasting or tools (an accessible area should never be specified as "best effort"). We make sure, however,  during the job walk or pre-bid meeting that it is clearly understood that best effort means the blaster needs to put some effort into it and not just skip over the area, but also, that they shouldn't spend all day on it. Then we clarify that we understand we can't inspect the surface and understand that a coating may not last in that area.

From boris vidic of CIS on December 18, 2013:
We, the people who are dealing with paint, may want to use common sense rather than "best effort."

From James Schuster of Painting Service Inspection on December 6, 2013:
When “best effort” is used, it is usually limited to areas that are inaccessible for abrasive blasting due to the design of the structure and therefore impossible to achieve the blast cleanliness level specified. These areas need to be evaluated on a case-by- case basis, and the “best effort” approach documented and dealt with as agreed upon to achieve the best result possible.

From Car F. of Municipal City on December 4, 2013:

“Best effort” is a subjective judgment based on good will and feel-good sentiments, not facts, usually bestowed upon children who are doing really bad in school due to laziness, poor family relations, poverty or other factors. This practice is not recommended for serious work where “best effort” can’t be measured in a tangible way in front of a judge investigating why your coating failed after 3 months.

Surgeon: “Sorry, Mr. Smith, we amputated the wrong leg, but we did our “best effort.”

Mr. Smith: "I understand doctor, I still have another leg and at least you did your “best effort.”

“Best effort” is a recipe for disaster that has no place in a trade that relies on certainties.

From Dzevdet Agoli of MIM on December 3, 2013:
Best effort means the blasting is compliant with recommended surface preparation as stated in the data sheet, as well as with relevant standards in regards to pre-blast treatment, surface preparation degree, surface profile, water-soluble salt contamination, oil contamination and dust contamination. All of these are covered by standards.

From Erik Andreassen of CFPS on March 26, 2012:
 The term "Best Effort" is not a specification. Reject this terminology used by obviously someone who has little or no knowledge of our industry.

From Christian Favennec of DCNS on February 19, 2012:
According to my experience, best effort is never enough and is a subjective criteria. If you receive a specification where it is asked to perform "best effort,", you have to translate it in not subjective criteria that can be measured on field. Criterias for degrees of blasting are defined in normalisation standards and correspond to level of cleanliness before painting (SSPC or ISO standards, for example). The degree of blasting depends on the kind of project (new building or maintenance), the environment, and the performance you want to reach. The level of cleanliness before painting must always be associated with other criterias, for example:  - Level of cleanliness: Sa 2 1/2 according to ISO 8501-1;

- Level of soluble salts : 3 µg/Cm²; according to ISO 8502-6 and 8502-9;
- Roughness: medium grit according to ISO 8503-1. 
With these crierias, you can well perform your job according to not subjective results and pronounce the reception of the job before going on in the process of painting.

From M Ehab of North Valley on March 21, 2012:
Best Efforts have no physical meaning. The safer method is to follow Paint Data Sheet Surface Preparation Recommendations.  If not available, blast to ISO Sa 2.5  (SSPC-SP 10/NACE #2 or similar grades).  In case of HPFW. Hand/Power Cleaning ISO St2/St3 (SSPC SP-2/SP-3) if primer is a surface-tolerant coating.

From Jim Brown of Corrosion Prevention on February 21, 2012:
When conditions prevent an inspector from reaching, seeing or touching an area, the criteria of “best effort” will exist. The facility owner knows of the condition before and thus lists it in the RFP.

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Tagged categories: Abrasive blasting; Specification; Specification writing


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