PaintSquare.com


The First Word in Protective & Marine Coatings

A Product of Technology Publishing / PaintSquare
JPCL | PaintSquare News | Durability + Design | Paint BidTracker

Download the FREE Equipment and Rental Resource Guide

Paint and Coatings Industry News

Main News Page


2nd PA Bridge Painter Killed in Fall

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Comment | More

Deer Isle Sedgwick Bridge

Authorities are investigating the death of a New Jersey painter who perished in a fall Sunday from the Deer Isle-Sedgwick Bridge in Maine, where he was working.

Ercio Gasques, 29, of Newark, NJ, was the second employee of Odyssey Contracting, of Houston, PA, to die in a bridge fall in the last 14 months.

Gasques was working on the bridge in eastern Maine when he fell about 2:15 p.m. Sunday, according to the Hancock Count Sheriff’s Department, which responded to the scene.

40-Foot Fall

“Gasques suffered massive head trauma from the fall and died from his injuries while en route to the hospital,” reported Lt. Tim Cote of the Sheriff’s Department.

Details of the accident remained sketchy Tuesday (Dec. 7), as a snowstorm after the accident dumped 18 inches of snow on the area, rendering it temporarily inaccessible, said Bill Coffin, area director for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which is investigating.

News reports said Gasques fell 40 feet from the bridge and landed on rocks. There was no information about what he had been doing or what type of fall protection he had.

Previous Citations, Fatality

Odyssey Contracting has been cited before on the Deer Isle bridge project. In August, OSHA issued a single serious citation to the company for transporting a crew of four in the back of a pickup truck to and from the work site, Coffin said. The citation carried a proposed penalty of $1,500.

In October 2009, another painter for Odyssey Contracting (also known as Odyssey Painting Co.) fell 124 feet to his death while working on the McKees Rock Bridge in McKees Rock, PA. Michael L'Hereaux, 54, of Ohio was conducting abrasive blasting under the Pittsburgh end of the bridge and fell from a two-point suspension scaffold.

The scaffold gave way when L'Hereaux accidentally turned his blast equipment on a cable that was holding the scaffold, an OSHA investigation later found.

The blast medium cut through the cable. L'Hereaux had been issued a safety harness but was not wearing it at the time, an OSHA spokeswoman said Tuesday.

In that case, the company eventually admitted to five citations (reduced from six) and a fine of $12,600 (reduced from $16,800) after an informal settlement with OSHA.

Stavros Semanderes, owner of Odyssey Contracting, did not respond Tuesday to requests for comment.

Odyssey is working under a $9,348,250 contract by the Maine Department of Transportation to recoat the suspension bridge, which was built in 1939. The bridge spans Eggemoggin Reach and features a 1,088-foot-long main span. The contract also includes performing various repairs.

   

Tagged categories: Accidents; Bridges; Contractors; Fall protection; Health and safety; Protective coatings

Comment from Thomas Van Hooser, (12/8/2010, 8:04 AM)

Cable from suspended scaffolding needs to be protected from possible damage from the work activity. In this case the risk was from abrasive blasting material but also could include welding, cutting, hydroblasting, etc.


Comment from Thomas Van Hooser, (12/8/2010, 8:06 AM)

A risk assessment should have been performed prior to this activity to identify all potiential hazards with the work. Obviousely risk assessments are not part of this organizations safety program.


Comment from William Sowers, (12/8/2010, 12:09 PM)

Was there a 3rd party inspector on this job???


Comment from David Grove, (12/8/2010, 3:17 PM)

I agree with Mr. Van Hooser's comment because if there was a review that identified the possibility of the cables being cut by work activities, then additional fall protection should have been specified, along with protection for the cables. Taking the time to identify "What if's" on a JHA/JSA, then adjusting for them in the work process/control, does not equate to the cost of a life. I am curious why this was not identified as a process failure before the accident by OSHA.


Comment from Paul Pausch, (12/8/2010, 3:30 PM)

This is the exact reason why I enforce my Fall-Arrest System policy & conduct monthly safety meetings. 2 fall related deaths in less than 2 years that could have easily been avoided had it not been for negligence!


Comment from Rick Thomas, (12/9/2010, 11:27 AM)

This bridge will move in the wind. Remember the Tacoma Narrows Bridge? Same designer. Wing Wind Deflectors were installed on this bridge in the early 1990s for better subility in high winds. Scary bridge to even drive over. So sad.


Comment from michael deaton, (11/15/2014, 7:07 AM)

osha investigated this incident thoroughly and found that the blast nozzle had to be held on the cable for over a minute for it to cut completely through it. Now I've blasted on thousands of suspended stages and for someone to blast their cable intentionally just doesn't make sense. There has to be more to the story than what actually is being told. I work for this man and he is very strict on safety. you CAN NOT watch every man every minute of every work day. Inside of containment's become zero visibility once you kick on several blast nozzles. R.I.P.Michael


Comment from Chuck Pease, (11/18/2014, 9:06 AM)

Article said the worker wasn't wearing his fall protection at the time. The suspended scaffold falling is a problem of course but could the death have been avoided had the worker been wearing his fall protection harness??? You can have 100 well thought out written JHA's but if you don't have compliance within the project team the JHA's are useless.Safety is a culture that needs to be embraced by the workers also.


Comment from michael deaton, (11/19/2014, 4:39 AM)

Mr Chuck. I agree with you that safety is a culture that needs to be embraced by the workers. I am a coatings supt. and deal with projects that require fall protection constantly and the idea that a man is off the ground, in a suspended staging, without his safety harness is mind boggling. Typically, when we set up a suspended staging, the cables for the staging are rigged on one horizontal cable or structural member, and the safety line, which the workers harness is hooked to, is hanging independently from a separate horizontal cable or structural member. If the staging fails, for whatever reason, it should fall right out from under the worker, leaving him hanging on the safety line which will initiate the rescue procedures. Once again there should be a 1 strike and your out policy on any worker caught without his fall protection not properly in place.


Comment Join the Conversation:

Sign in to our community to add your comments.

Safway Services
Suspended Access Made Easy With QuikDeck™

The smart choice for suspended access, QuikDeck’s interchangeable, lightweight components make them easy to set up and reassemble when you need to move.


Minerals Research & Recovery

HIGH PERFORMANCE ABRASIVES


“Made in the USA!”

Why recycle waste from other countries? Go FASTER, CLEANER, at 1/3 THE COST with MR&R “All-American” Sharpshot®HP!!

WATCH THE VIDEO


SSPC: The Society for Protective Coatings
http://www.sspc.org/

Join SSPC and Enhance
Your Career !


ITW Binks
Built for Tough Jobs

From Epoxies to Urethanes to other high solid coatings, the new Binks Airless 75 delivers a great finish using an ergonomic design. Visit binks.com for more information.


Surface Prep Supply
Surface Prep Supply

Blast It! Coat It! We have you covered every step of the way. Supplier of:
• Abrasives
• Equipment
• Accessories
• Protective Coatings
888-331-7737(PREP)


International Paint LLC

International Paint Engineered Coatings

Learn about our solutions for:
  • Structural Steel
  • Piping & Equipment
  • Storage Tanks
  • Pressure Vessels
  • Secondary Containment


    Atlantic Design, Inc.
    MORE THAN JUST A SALES PITCH!

    Simplicity! Dependability! Safety! We’ve built these features into every cleverly engineered inch of our newest models. It’s all there. 866.Call.ADI

  •  
     
     
    Technology Publishing

    The Technology Publishing Network

    The Journal of Protective Coatings & Linings (JPCL) PaintSquare
    Durability + Design Paint BidTracker JPCL Europe

     
    EXPLORE:      JPCL   |   PaintSquare News   |   Interact   |   Buying Guides   |   Webinars   |   Resources   |   Classifieds
    REGISTER AND SUBSCRIBE:      Free PaintSquare Registration   |   Subscribe to JPCL   |   Subscribe to PaintSquare News
    MORE:      About PaintSquare.com   |   Privacy policy   |   Terms & conditions   |   Site Map   |   Search   |   Contact Us
     

    © Copyright 2000-2014, Technology Publishing / PaintSquare, All rights reserved
    2100 Wharton Street, Suite 310, Pittsburgh PA 15203-1951; Tel 1-412-431-8300; Fax 1-412-431-5428; E-mail webmaster@paintsquare.com