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Yale Finds Reason to Watch Paint Dry

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

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Microscopic fluorescent tracking particles

Contrary to the old saying, watching paint dry can be quite interesting when the goal is to study coatings failure, and a team of Yale researchers has developed a method to do just that.

The team has come up with a new technique to study the mechanics of coatings as they dry and peel, and has discovered that the process is far from mundane, the university reports.

In the Aug 9-13 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team presents a new way to image and analyze the mechanical stress that causes colloidal coatings—those in which microscopic particles of one substance are dispersed throughout another—to peel off of surfaces.

Understanding how and why coatings fail has broad applications in the physical and biological sciences, said Eric Dufresne, the John J. Lee Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Yale and lead author of the study.

“Coatings protect almost every surface you encounter, from paint on a wall, to Teflon on a frying pan, to the skin on our own bodies,” Dufresne said. “When coatings peel and crack, they put the underlying material at risk.

“Our research is aimed at pinpointing the failure of coatings. We’ve developed this new technique to zoom in on coatings and watch them fail at the microscopic level.”

To visualize the microscopic motion of paint in 3D, the team mixed in tiny fluorescent particles that glow when illuminated by a laser. By tracing the motion of these particles over time with a microscope, they captured the motion of the paint as it peeled and dried in detail.

In addition, the team was able to track the 3-D forces generated by the paint as it dried, producing a “stress map” of the mechanical deformation of the coating as it failed.

 “The trick was to apply the paint to a soft surface, made of silicone rubber, that is ever so slightly deformed by the gentle forces exerted by the drying paint,” Dufresne said.

Although the current study focuses on colloidal coatings, the technique could be applied to all kinds of coatings, Dufresne said. Next, the team hopes to improve on current methods for mitigating peeling in a wide range of coatings.

Said Dufresne: “This is a completely new way of looking at a very old problem.”

   

Tagged categories: Coating failure; Failure analysis; Peeling; Research

Comment from Steve Bell, (8/11/2010, 9:56 AM)

Coatings fail from a number of reasons ... improper substrate preparation, improper coating specification, improper coating application, ie. cutting corners. do we really need to invest into how paint peels or should we invest into product research to enhance the longevity


Comment from Jim Deardorff, (8/11/2010, 12:22 PM)

Comment. My name is Jim Deardorff I have read the article on "Watching Paint Dry" and the use of fluorescence to monitor defects. I have been using a similar process for the last 20 years for industrial coatings. I use a special additive in my primer coat overcoated with standard intermedia and finish coats. During the initial application uniform coverage and saturation of a surface can easily be monitored by UV-A black light illumination. The process can also be used as an early warning defect detection system to locate areas of early system failure before complete system failure occurs and irreversible corrsion damage begins. The application of premanent foundation primer coats overcoated with expendable intermediate finish coats offer a high degree of system performance and reduces the need for extensive surface preparation and recoating operations. I have written a number of articles on this subject. Currently, testing a new nanotechnology from Europe that can extend the service life of paints and coatings by 50 percent by maintaining impereability against moisture and acid rain pollution. Jim Deardorff Superior Coatings Ph; (660) 646-6355


Comment from don_rom_ross@msn.c, (8/11/2010, 3:39 PM)

One of the major problems for paint failure on the siding of a home is caused by a moisture problem within the wall cavity. May I suggest that you go online to www.wedgevent.com you can view a shot video and read numerous articles pertaining to peeling paint


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