PaintSquare.com
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on LinkedIn Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram Visit the TPC Store
Search the site

 

Advertisement

PaintSquare


Coatings Industry News

Main News Page


Research Reveals Benefits of Locally Made Concrete

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Comment | More

In response to the decay of the U.S.’s concrete-based infrastructure, much of which has not been designed to accommodate modern-day stressors, researchers based out of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have started to investigate a new way of formulating concrete—using the hierarchy arrangements of a natural building block method that could make concrete both stronger and more sustainable.

The study, led by Oral Buyukozturk, professor of civil and environmental engineering at MIT, investigated a key component of concrete, down at the atom level, which contributes to the substance’s overall strength and durability.

Research Simulations

To assist with the study, researchers developed a computer simulation of the behavior of individual atoms that form molecular building blocks within a hardening material. What the simulations revealed was that these structures demonstrated a “frictional” resistance under sliding deformation.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

According to the university, the team is currently examining ways in which cohesive and frictional forces of groups of atoms are improved by adding in elements such as volcanic ash or refinery slag. The simulation may also help advise designers in choosing local additives for future projects, which can result in the engineering of stronger concrete.

From there, the team developed a cohesive-frictional force field that incorporated these interactions within larger scale particles.

The purpose behind this? To better understand the way strength develops in concrete.

According to the university, the team is currently examining ways in which cohesive and frictional forces of groups of atoms are improved by adding in elements such as volcanic ash or refinery slag. The simulation may also help advise designers in choosing local additives for future projects, which can result in the engineering of stronger concrete.

“The conditions of the world are changing,” Buyukozturk said. “There are increased environmental demands, including from earthquakes and floods, and stresses on infrastructure. We need to come up with materials that are sustainable, with much longer design life and better durability. That is a big challenge.”

Research Simulation

In the study, researchers simulated mixtures containing Portland cement. What was simulated was the mechanical response of calcium-silicate-hydrate, which is the main phase that forms when Portland cement reacts with water. The researchers modeled the movements of the atoms in a C-S-H building block. Cohesive forces influenced particles to stick together.

This was expanded to a larger size, which was dubbed “mesoscale” in the study. Upon further investigation, MIT noted, researchers discovered that the degree to which the frictional properties resisted the movement and separation of colloids at the mesoscale was the strongest factor in determining the strength of concrete at the centimeter scale.

“The material science of cement strength is still in its infancy regarding molecular-level descriptions and an ability to perform quantitative predictions,” said Sidney Yip, professor emeritus in MIT’s Department of Nuclear Engineering, who is also working on the study.

“The issue of frictional force, addressed in our work, pertains to the mechanical behavior of cement that varies over time. This rate sensitivity is an aspect of the scientific challenges at the mesoscale, which is the research frontier where microscale concepts and models developed in several physical science disciplines are linked to macroscale properties for technological applications.”

Local Inspiration

In looking to use local elements in concrete materials, Buyukozturk admits that he was inspired by the Romans, who, through using nearby materials in the creation of their concrete, built buildings that have lasted over 2,000 years.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

In response to the decay of the U.S.’s concrete-based infrastructure, much of which has not been designed to accommodate modern-day stressors, researchers based out of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have started to investigate a new way of formulating concrete—using the hierarchy arrangements of a natural building block method that could make concrete both stronger and more sustainable.

“They probably did this through intuition,” Buyukozturk said. “Ours is an effort to hopefully implement that kind of philosophy of using materials that are locally available, by understanding the underlying scientific principles within those materials.”

Moving Forward

Currently, researchers are working on incorporating more additives to investigate their effect. Preliminary studies indicate that there is a chemical dependence of the friction value. In the future, the influence of additives on the chemical composition of these colloidal phases will be investigated, and the information may assist with the creation of a database that would be geared toward the optimization of concrete materials.

“We know relatively little of what happens when additives are used in concrete,” Steven Palkovic, a graduate student working on the study, said.

“We would not expect volcanic ash from Saudi Arabia to give the same performance as volcanic ash from Hawaii. So we need this greater understanding of the material, that starts at the atomistic scale and accounts for the chemistry of the material. That can give us greater control and understanding of how we can use additives to create a better material.”

The results of the study were published in the Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids. Research was partially funded by the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences.

   

Tagged categories: Cement; Colleges and Universities; concrete; Research and development

Comment Join the Conversation:

Sign in to our community to add your comments.

Advertisements
 
SAFE Systems, Inc.
 
Custom blast rooms
by SAFE Systems
 
Don't waste time and money "making do" with a "standard" design. Let us work with you to design and build the system that best fits your requirements.
Call 1-800-634-7278
 

 
Detail Masters
 
Overspray Removal
 
We offer professional, turnkey service and unparalleled quality!
Our process can save hundreds— even thousands of dollars. It's fast, environmentally safe and 100% guaranteed.
 

 
Industrial Vacuum Equipment Corp.
 
Hurricane Vacuums
& Dust Collectors
 
Vacuum and dust collector hose, filters and related accessories.
IndustrialVacuum.com
 

 
SABRE Autonomous Solutions
 
Repeatability
 
The ALPHA1 provides reliable results consistently allowing you to cost your next job with confidence.
 

 
HoldTight Solutions Inc.
 
NO FLASH RUST - NO CONTAMINANTS
 
Our HoldTight®102 salt remover & flash rust
preventer prevents flash
rust by removing surface contaminants. Contact us
for your nearest distributor.
(800) 319.8802 sales@holdtight.com
 

 
Tarps manufacturing, Inc.
 
QUALITY MADE IN AMERICA —Available near you!
 
CLICK to get a behind-the-scenes look at how Tarps Manufacturing makes the highest-quality tarps right here in the USA — available nationwide.
 

 
Mitsubishi Gas Chemical America
 
Performance Amine 1,3-BAC
 
A highly reactive cycloaliphatic diamine offering superior performance. Reasonable cost and curing efficacy makes it suitable for all types of epoxy resin applications.
 

 
Graco Inc.
 
Graco EcoQuip 2: Experience the Difference
 
While others claim their equipment is the same, none of them compare to Graco’s EcoQuip 2™ Vapor Abrasive® blasting line. Visit graco.com/ecoquip to learn more.
 

 
NLB Corporation
 
NLB Sure Shroud: Greater Protection and Flexibility
 
NLB’s Sure Shroud’s lighter weight and flexibility reduces operator fatigue and offers unmatched protection against high pressure hose ruptures. 10k to 40k psi rated.
 

 
Vector Technologies Ltd.
 
The Original Performance Proven Vacuum Solutions
 
VecLoader® 616 Double Dump, Continuous Vacuum, 170 HP w/ 2,400 CFM & 28” Hg. 33% More Efficient than traditional vacuum systems! Choose Vector for the most powerful and the most reliable trailer mounted vacuums in the industry! Email us at: inquiry@vector-vacuums.com or call us at: 800-832-4010
 

 
 
 

Technology Publishing Co., 1501 Reedsdale Street, Suite 2008, Pittsburgh, PA 15233

TEL 1-412-431-8300  • FAX  1-412-431-5428  •  EMAIL webmaster@paintsquare.com


The Technology Publishing Network

Durability + Design PaintSquare the Journal of Protective Coatings & Linings Paint BidTracker

 
EXPLORE:      JPCL   |   PaintSquare News   |   Interact   |   Buying Guides   |   Webinars   |   Resources   |   Classifieds
REGISTER AND SUBSCRIBE:      Free PaintSquare Registration   |   Subscribe to JPCL   |   Subscribe to PaintSquare News
MORE:      About PaintSquare.com   |   Privacy policy (Updated 1/8/2018)   |   Terms & conditions   |   Site Map   |   Search   |   Contact Us