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Applicator Training Bulletin
Fundamentals of stripe coating

From JPCL, January 2014

   

Tagged categories: Edges; Paint application; Quality control; Striping

Comment from Michael Deaton, (2/26/2014, 7:03 AM)

After supervising the 1 million square foot Innerbelt project in Cleveland last year and dealing with the very intense inspection by Mr. Dave Nolan, owner of Quality Control Services, stripe coating was an essential part of the coatings application. There is over a half a million bolts on this project and the finish coat is white, therefore the stripe coat must provide a paint tight seal. Painters utilized 4" cigar or weeny rollers to apply 1st the organic zinc, then macropoxy 646 and finally the acrylic polyurethane to all bolts, edges, welds, etc. The finish coat only required striping where the airless gun could not access, but both the primer coat and the intermediate required full striping. This striping was very time consuming and should be factored into any bid.


Comment from Tom Selby, (2/26/2014, 12:49 PM)

It makes more sense to get all blasted surfaces covered with the first coat of paint so that there is no compromising of the quality of the initial blast. After that coat is dry a contrasting color can be used to stripe coat with a brush or weenie roller.


Comment from Billy Russell, (2/26/2014, 4:35 PM)

Great Article !!!!! "Now end the "Can we spray the stripe coat" if you want a coating system to Last stripe with Brush/Roller contrasting color, Then make sure it's right.


Comment from Karen Fischer, (2/28/2014, 10:03 AM)

Great Article! In my experience, both brush/roller and spray application of the stripe coat can be appropriate depending on the location on the structure. I've found that the edges of flanges respond better to spray application of the stripe coat (brush strokes often "clean" the paint from the outside corners/edges defeating the purpose), whereas, brush application is far more appropriate for areas such as nuts/bolts and complex areas. Both methods can be applied concurrently. I agree that application of a stripe coat after a full coat is by far the best method to preserve the newly blasted surface.


Comment from Tom Selby, (2/28/2014, 10:26 AM)

It also is helpful to use unthinned paint on the edges. The paint will have more of a tendancy to not pull away. Then thin the coating before stripe coating the welds as they can sometimes present an irregular surface..


Comment from Andrew Tsai, (11/6/2014, 10:00 PM)

Is there a rule of thumb to determine the percentage of stripe coat Vs main coat?


Comment from Simon Wadsworth, (11/10/2014, 9:35 AM)

I'm not sure why stripe coating would not always be required, as it is used to bring the coat thickness over edges up to at least the same thickness as on the main surfaces? The only reason to omit it would be if, due to practical reasons of application, the overall coat thickness is in excess of what was required for the corrosivity of the environment. In which case maybe the main system could be reduced in thickness and cost? Also note that some hot rolled steel sections are not treated as "edges" as they are sufficiently rounded and for some items such as infill bars, another overall coat is easier to specify.


Comment from Per Gabrielsson, (11/11/2014, 7:14 AM)

Stripe coating with roller is in most cases a "monkey shine" only as the coating is not mechanically worked into the surface but only splahed on. Some spots become overthick By roller, whilst some actually receive only a coloring. I never accept roller striping on my projects.


Comment from michael deaton, (11/12/2014, 6:03 AM)

I've been involved in stripe coating since 1986 and we have tried it every way imaginable. eWlds are the only item that requires brush stripping and will normally specify that in the specifications. On these massive bridge project, you will NOT see a paint brush in a painters hands unless it specifically says it in the specs. Weep holes, stiffener edges, diaphragm edges, bolt patterns all will be striped with cigar rollers and in some cases, conventional spray.


Comment from michael deaton, (11/13/2014, 5:21 AM)

These new bridge designs are built in a manner that presents hundreds of thousands of bolts. I am presently project supt. on the Q bridge in New Haven Connecticut. This particular bridge came from the shop in finish coat so only the bolt/splice connections require painting with the exception of the mechanical damage. We are utilizing weeny rollers for all of the work on the bolts connections and dog leg brushes and dobbers behind the cracks on the splices. After working a job last year with an inspector by the name of Mr. Dave Nolan, owner of probably the premier inspection firm on the planet, Quality Control Services, we learned quick that a paint tight seal on bolts WILL be achieved. These contractors that think they are going to run up on a job and "rape and run" on the stripe coat, have to rethink their approach when dealing with a real inspector such as Dave. You will end up setting up a mailbox and residency on that project if you try to cheat on any phase of the surface prep or coatings application.


Comment from Michael Beitzel, (11/13/2014, 11:23 AM)

To take full advantage of all the benefits of striping, the prime stripe should be tinted and brush applied to seams, welds, and fasteners prior to spray application of the full prime coat. Edges could be striped by spray with a tinted prime coat after spray prime coat application. In most cases this could be accomplished without fear of loosing an SP 10 blast. If not and the blast is turning that fast there are other problems such as non-visible contaminants or unacceptable ambient conditions for the application of either stripe or full coats of paint.


Comment from Mark Puckett, (11/14/2014, 11:04 AM)

Here in MD on all bridge projects they specifically specify different tinted stripe coating on prime zinc and intermediate epoxy before top urethane (not striped)..on all welds edges bolts rivets etc...they also specify caulking in various places generally rolling and daubing seems to be the preferred method mostly to prevent dry over spraying adjoining area I think and for paint conservation..recently I did see a spec calling out curing of the stripe coats to recoat times...seemed very foolish as a huge time waster instead of to touch as mentioned above


Comment from michael deaton, (12/31/2014, 7:10 AM)

Great conversation between a group of professionals. I believe the end result proved that stripe coating on nuts and bolts HAVE to be done with brush and roller.


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